Key Points

Reducing carbon emissions is a global problem that requires international solutions. But it is falling on the States to provide the leadership.

The scientific community recommends that greenhouse gases be cut to half the 2010 level by 2030, but we are not on target to meet these goals.

Some renewable scenarios are now cost-competitive with convention energy generation sources.

The Center for the New Energy Economy offers substantive, practical, free resources for State legislators to address these issues effectively. (Link to: http://cnee.colostate.edu/)

Patrick Cummins

SEPTEMBER 19-22, 2019

Policy Explosion in the States

Patrick Cummins

Senior Policy Advisor
Center for the New Energy Economy
Colorado State University

Patrick Cummins is Senior Policy Advisor for the Center for the New Energy Economy at Colorado State University, which includes a group of energy policy experts led by Colorado’s former Governor, Bill Ritter Jr. The purpose of the Center is to help decision-makers to create policies that facilitate America’s equitable transition to a clean energy economy.

Lieutenant Governor Howie Morales (at center) welcomed the Forum to New Mexico, accompanied by Senate President Mary Kay Papen (NM) and Sen. Peter Wirth (NM).

States Are Embracing Clean Energy Policies: Cost-Competitiveness

Clean energy policies reduce the environmental risks associated with conventional energy generation, and technologic advances have made some clean options cost-competitive with conventional energy generation technologies such as coal and nuclear.

US Net Generation by Source

States Are Embracing Clean Energy Policies: To Meet Future Demands

As coal, nuclear, and older oil energy generation plants are retired, renewable sources, especially solar, are projected by the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) to meeting future demand while reducing risk.

Annual Electricity Generating Capacity Additions and Retirements
(Reference Case)

Getting There: Free Resources from the Center

A Policy Explosion

Since 2013, more than 2,600 energy bills have been passed in legislatures across the country addressing a broad range of environmental issues. Additionally, 29 states have mandatory Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards (“RPS”), and 8 states have a voluntary goal for implementing renewables. States also are adopting or considering standards for clean energy, energy efficiency, and low- and zero-emission vehicles.

Senators Andrea Stewart-Cousins (NY) and Ronald Kouchi (HI) posed during a break in the sessions.

Speaker Biography

Patrick Cummins  

Patrick Cummins is a Senior Policy Advisor at the Center for the New Energy Economy where he leads the Center’s work with Western states, utilities, and stakeholders on the transition to a low-carbon economy. Patrick has been working with Western states and stakeholders on air quality and climate programs for 30 years, including at Metro Denver’s Regional Air Quality Council, and as the Director of Air Quality and Climate Programs at the Western Governors’ Association. Prior to joining Governor Ritter’s team at Colorado State University he served as Executive Director of the Western Climate Initiative, where he helped develop and implement the world’s first economy-wide cap-and-trade program for greenhouse gas emissions which is being implemented by the State of California and the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario. Patrick has a Chemistry Degree from Fort Lewis College and a Master’s Degree in Environmental Policy from Indiana University.

CONTACT

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2019 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

SEPTEMBER 19-22, 2019

Policy Explosion in the States

Patrick Cummins

Senior Policy Advisor
Center for the New Energy Economy
Colorado State University

Key Points Reducing carbon emissions is a global problem that requires international solutions. But it is falling on the States to provide the leadership. The scientific community recommends that greenhouse gases be cut to half the 2010 level by 2030, but we are not on target to meet these goals. Some renewable scenarios are now cost-competitive with convention energy generation sources. The Center for the New Energy Economy offers substantive, practical, free resources for State legislators to address these issues effectively. (Link to: http://cnee.colostate.edu/)

Patrick Cummins is Senior Policy Advisor for the Center for the New Energy Economy at Colorado State University, which includes a group of energy policy experts led by Colorado’s former Governor, Bill Ritter Jr. The purpose of the Center is to help decision-makers to create policies that facilitate America’s equitable transition to a clean energy economy.

Lieutenant Governor Howie Morales (at center) welcomed the Forum to New Mexico, accompanied by Senate President Mary Kay Papen (NM) and Sen. Peter Wirth (NM).

States Are Embracing Clean Energy Policies:
Cost-Competitiveness

Clean energy policies reduce the environmental risks associated with conventional energy generation, and technologic advances have made some clean options cost-competitive with conventional energy generation technologies such as coal and nuclear.

US Net Generation by Source

States Are Embracing Clean Energy Policies:
To Meet Future Demands

As coal, nuclear, and older oil energy generation plants are retired, renewable sources, especially solar, are projected by the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) to meeting future demand while reducing risk.

Annual Electricity Generating Capacity Additions
and Retirements (Reference Case)

Getting There: Free Resources from the Center

A Policy Explosion

Since 2013, more than 2,600 energy bills have been passed in legislatures across the country addressing a broad range of environmental issues. Additionally, 29 states have mandatory Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards (“RPS”), and 8 states have a voluntary goal for implementing renewables. States also are adopting or considering standards for clean energy, energy efficiency, and low- and zero-emission vehicles.

Senators Andrea Stewart-Cousins (NY) and Ronald Kouchi (HI) posed during a break in the sessions.

Speaker Biography 

Patrick Cummins is a Senior Policy Advisor at the Center for the New Energy Economy where he leads the Center’s work with Western states, utilities, and stakeholders on the transition to a low-carbon economy. Patrick has been working with Western states and stakeholders on air quality and climate programs for 30 years, including at Metro Denver’s Regional Air Quality Council, and as the Director of Air Quality and Climate Programs at the Western Governors’ Association. Prior to joining Governor Ritter’s team at Colorado State University he served as Executive Director of the Western Climate Initiative, where he helped develop and implement the world’s first economy-wide cap-and-trade program for greenhouse gas emissions which is being implemented by the State of California and the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario. Patrick has a Chemistry Degree from Fort Lewis College and a Master’s Degree in Environmental Policy from Indiana University.

SEPTEMBER 19-22, 2019

Policy Explosion in the States

Patrick Cummins

Senior Policy Advisor
Center for the New Energy Economy
Colorado State University

Key Points Reducing carbon emissions is a global problem that requires international solutions. But it is falling on the States to provide the leadership. The scientific community recommends that greenhouse gases be cut to half the 2010 level by 2030, but we are not on target to meet these goals. Some renewable scenarios are now cost-competitive with convention energy generation sources. The Center for the New Energy Economy offers substantive, practical, free resources for State legislators to address these issues effectively. (Link to: http://cnee.colostate.edu/)

Patrick Cummins is Senior Policy Advisor for the Center for the New Energy Economy at Colorado State University, which includes a group of energy policy experts led by Colorado’s former Governor, Bill Ritter Jr. The purpose of the Center is to help decision-makers to create policies that facilitate America’s equitable transition to a clean energy economy.

Lieutenant Governor Howie Morales (at center) welcomed the Forum to New Mexico, accompanied by Senate President Mary Kay Papen (NM) and Sen. Peter Wirth (NM).

States Are Embracing Clean Energy Policies:
Cost-Competitiveness

Clean energy policies reduce the environmental risks associated with conventional energy generation, and technologic advances have made some clean options cost-competitive with conventional energy generation technologies such as coal and nuclear.

US Net Generation by Source

States Are Embracing Clean Energy Policies:
To Meet Future Demands

As coal, nuclear, and older oil energy generation plants are retired, renewable sources, especially solar, are projected by the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) to meeting future demand while reducing risk.

Annual Electricity Generating Capacity Additions
and Retirements (Reference Case)

Getting There: Free Resources from the Center

A Policy Explosion

Since 2013, more than 2,600 energy bills have been passed in legislatures across the country addressing a broad range of environmental issues. Additionally, 29 states have mandatory Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards (“RPS”), and 8 states have a voluntary goal for implementing renewables. States also are adopting or considering standards for clean energy, energy efficiency, and low- and zero-emission vehicles.

Senators Andrea Stewart-Cousins (NY) and Ronald Kouchi (HI) posed during a break in the sessions.

Speaker Biography 

Patrick Cummins is a Senior Policy Advisor at the Center for the New Energy Economy where he leads the Center’s work with Western states, utilities, and stakeholders on the transition to a low-carbon economy. Patrick has been working with Western states and stakeholders on air quality and climate programs for 30 years, including at Metro Denver’s Regional Air Quality Council, and as the Director of Air Quality and Climate Programs at the Western Governors’ Association. Prior to joining Governor Ritter’s team at Colorado State University he served as Executive Director of the Western Climate Initiative, where he helped develop and implement the world’s first economy-wide cap-and-trade program for greenhouse gas emissions which is being implemented by the State of California and the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario. Patrick has a Chemistry Degree from Fort Lewis College and a Master’s Degree in Environmental Policy from Indiana University.