REPORT: November 5, 2021 Member Meeting

Leaders’ Roundtable:
Workforce Development

Introduction

 

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Sen. Robert Stivers
President of the Senate, Kentucky

We had some labor shortages even before the pandemic, and we are not yet back to pre-COVID employment levels. Thousands of jobs are open in the state. The Boston Senate Presidents’ Forum stimulated ideas about how we can enhance workforce development. In Kentucky, we applied for and received a $1.5 million labor grant, which will fund “Second Chance” training programs for “hidden workers.” Additionally, we are considering a tax credit for employers who offer day care for their employees’ children.

Sen. Martin Looney
Senate President Pro Tempore, Connecticut

Connecticut has embraced a model created by WorkPlace, which, since 1983, has delivered programs to develop a well-educated, well-trained, and self-sufficient workforce that can confidently compete in today’s changing global marketplace. The program works with a wide scope of business leaders, local officials and other stakeholders to develop innovative workforce plans that identify and address the area’s employment needs and interests.

AIn the state program, workers are matched with open jobs. Recognizing that many people are highly motivated to have a job after long periods without working, one state program is focused on training people after prison or substance abuse treatment. They receive wrap-around services such as housing and ongoing contact with parole officers to help sustain them in employment.

Additionally, current strong state revenues and federal COVID funds have been allocated by the Legislature for daycare support programs to help people keep their jobs. And funds have been allocated to close the gap between what students can afford and the costs of attending college or certification and licensing programs.

Tom Finneran (Moderator): Are employers resistant to hiring formerly incarcerated people?

Sen. Looney: One positive effect of the COVID pandemic is that employers are more willing to give formerly incarcerated people a second chance, especially if they come from programs that provide oversight. The training and mentorship they receive helps make them better employees.

Sen. Bill Ferguson
President of the Senate, Maryland

Maryland’s labor crisis is acute because we have a healthcare-focused labor market, and healthcare professionals are leaving the field due to COVID burn-out or taking traveling jobs that offer up to $210 per hour. The Johns Hopkins system, for example, has 4,000 vacancies and the University of Maryland Healthcare has 3,300 vacancies. Many hospitals have shut down wings because they lack the personnel to staff them.

One proposed response has been to speed up nursing training. An executive order issued during COVID permitted registered nurses to do their final year of training on the job. However, this has met with resistance from nursing boards.

Sen. Karen Fann
President of the Senate, Arizona

Sen. Peter Micciche
President of the Senate, Alaska

Sen. Larry Taylor
Chair, Senate Education Committee, Texas

Sen. Thomas Alexander
Chair, Senate Labor Commerce and Industry Committee,
South Carolinas

Sen. Lee Schoenbeck
President of the Senate, South Dakota

Sen. Jeremy Miller
Senate Majority Leader, Minnesota

Summary

The discussion of workforce development highlighted the continuing labor shortages in most states; however, innovative and successful programs have been developed to address this need. Several states have piloted programs targeted at hidden workers, such as formerly incarcerated individuals and those coming from substance abuse recovery programs. Providing wrap-around services such as day care, housing assistance, transportation, or mentoring programs were identified as effective strategies to help these workers succeed. Matching skills training to specific open jobs is an essential element. A variety of partnerships between states and their community colleges and industry leaders were shown to be effective. A key element of all successful programs is to focus on positions that earn a “family-sustaining or livable wage.”

Download PDF of article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden WorkersThe term hidden workers, coined by researchers at Harvard Business School, relates to untapped pools of potential workforce talent, such as people getting out of jail or completing substance use disorder programs. These workers can be highly motivated to succeed when given a second chance.Hidden Workers: Untapped TalentDownloadable Report published by Harvard Business School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sen. Bill Ferguson (MD) kindly shared the following resources:Diagnosing skill gap issues and interventionsARPA policy intervention resources
(per State Recovery Now)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

REPORT: November 5, 2021 Member Meeting

Leaders’ Roundtable:
Workforce Development

Introduction

 

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Sen. Robert Stivers
President of the Senate, Kentucky

We had some labor shortages even before the pandemic, and we are not yet back to pre-COVID employment levels. Thousands of jobs are open in the state. The Boston Senate Presidents’ Forum stimulated ideas about how we can enhance workforce development. In Kentucky, we applied for and received a $1.5 million labor grant, which will fund “Second Chance” training programs for “hidden workers.” Additionally, we are considering a tax credit for employers who offer day care for their employees’ children.

Sen. Martin Looney
Senate President Pro Tempore, Connecticut

Connecticut has embraced a model created by WorkPlace, which, since 1983, has delivered programs to develop a well-educated, well-trained, and self-sufficient workforce that can confidently compete in today’s changing global marketplace. The program works with a wide scope of business leaders, local officials and other stakeholders to develop innovative workforce plans that identify and address the area’s employment needs and interests.

AIn the state program, workers are matched with open jobs. Recognizing that many people are highly motivated to have a job after long periods without working, one state program is focused on training people after prison or substance abuse treatment. They receive wrap-around services such as housing and ongoing contact with parole officers to help sustain them in employment.

Additionally, current strong state revenues and federal COVID funds have been allocated by the Legislature for daycare support programs to help people keep their jobs. And funds have been allocated to close the gap between what students can afford and the costs of attending college or certification and licensing programs.

Tom Finneran (Moderator): Are employers resistant to hiring formerly incarcerated people?

Sen. Looney: One positive effect of the COVID pandemic is that employers are more willing to give formerly incarcerated people a second chance, especially if they come from programs that provide oversight. The training and mentorship they receive helps make them better employees.

Sen. Bill Ferguson
President of the Senate, Maryland

Maryland’s labor crisis is acute because we have a healthcare-focused labor market, and healthcare professionals are leaving the field due to COVID burn-out or taking traveling jobs that offer up to $210 per hour. The Johns Hopkins system, for example, has 4,000 vacancies and the University of Maryland Healthcare has 3,300 vacancies. Many hospitals have shut down wings because they lack the personnel to staff them.

One proposed response has been to speed up nursing training. An executive order issued during COVID permitted registered nurses to do their final year of training on the job. However, this has met with resistance from nursing boards.

Sen. Karen Fann
President of the Senate, Arizona

Sen. Peter Micciche
President of the Senate, Alaska

Sen. Larry Taylor
Chair, Senate Education Committee, Texas

Sen. Thomas Alexander
Chair, Senate Labor Commerce and Industry Committee,
South Carolinas

Sen. Lee Schoenbeck
President of the Senate, South Dakota

Sen. Jeremy Miller
Senate Majority Leader, Minnesota

Summary

Download PDF of article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden WorkersThe term hidden workers, coined by researchers at Harvard Business School, relates to untapped pools of potential workforce talent, such as people getting out of jail or completing substance use disorder programs. These workers can be highly motivated to succeed when given a second chance.Hidden Workers: Untapped TalentDownloadable Report published by Harvard Business School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sen. Bill Ferguson (MD) kindly shared the following resources:Diagnosing skill gap issues and interventionsARPA policy intervention resources
(per State Recovery Now)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

REPORT: November 5, 2021 Member Meeting

Download PDF of article

Leaders’ Roundtable:
Workforce Development

Introduction

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Sen. Robert Stivers
President of the Senate, Kentucky

We had some labor shortages even before the pandemic, and we are not yet back to pre-COVID employment levels. Thousands of jobs are open in the state. The Boston Senate Presidents’ Forum stimulated ideas about how we can enhance workforce development. In Kentucky, we applied for and received a $1.5 million labor grant, which will fund “Second Chance” training programs for “hidden workers.” Additionally, we are considering a tax credit for employers who offer day care for their employees’ children.

Hidden WorkersThe term hidden workers, coined by researchers at Harvard Business School, relates to untapped pools of potential workforce talent, such as people getting out of jail or completing substance use disorder programs. These workers can be highly motivated to succeed when given a second chance.Hidden Workers: Untapped TalentDownloadable Report published by Harvard Business School

Sen. Martin Looney
Senate President Pro Tempore, Connecticut

Connecticut has embraced a model created by WorkPlace, which, since 1983, has delivered programs to develop a well-educated, well-trained, and self-sufficient workforce that can confidently compete in today’s changing global marketplace. The program works with a wide scope of business leaders, local officials and other stakeholders to develop innovative workforce plans that identify and address the area’s employment needs and interests.

AIn the state program, workers are matched with open jobs. Recognizing that many people are highly motivated to have a job after long periods without working, one state program is focused on training people after prison or substance abuse treatment. They receive wrap-around services such as housing and ongoing contact with parole officers to help sustain them in employment.

Additionally, current strong state revenues and federal COVID funds have been allocated by the Legislature for daycare support programs to help people keep their jobs. And funds have been allocated to close the gap between what students can afford and the costs of attending college or certification and licensing programs.

Tom Finneran (Moderator): Are employers resistant to hiring formerly incarcerated people?

Sen. Looney: One positive effect of the COVID pandemic is that employers are more willing to give formerly incarcerated people a second chance, especially if they come from programs that provide oversight. The training and mentorship they receive helps make them better employees.

Sen. Bill Ferguson
President of the Senate, Maryland

Maryland’s labor crisis is acute because we have a healthcare-focused labor market, and healthcare professionals are leaving the field due to COVID burn-out or taking traveling jobs that offer up to $210 per hour. The Johns Hopkins system, for example, has 4,000 vacancies and the University of Maryland Healthcare has 3,300 vacancies. Many hospitals have shut down wings because they lack the personnel to staff them.

One proposed response has been to speed up nursing training. An executive order issued during COVID permitted registered nurses to do their final year of training on the job. However, this has met with resistance from nursing boards.

Sen. Bill Ferguson (MD) kindly shared the following resources:Diagnosing skill gap issues and interventionsARPA policy intervention resources
(per State Recovery Now)

Sen. Karen Fann
President of the Senate, Arizona

Sen. Peter Micciche
President of the Senate, Alaska

Sen. Larry Taylor
Chair, Senate Education Committee, Texas

Sen. Thomas Alexander
Chair, Senate Labor Commerce and Industry Committee,
South Carolinas

Sen. Lee Schoenbeck
President of the Senate, South Dakota

Sen. Jeremy Miller
Senate Majority Leader, Minnesota

Summary

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.