JANUARY 3–6, 2019

Instability of Central America & the US Response (Part 2)

Political Climate

Manuel Orozco, PhD

Director
Migration, Remittances and Development
Inter-American Dialogue

Dr. Orozco reported a trend of increasing state fragility and political instability in Central America since 2010. He drew a stark picture of the trends, causes, and scenarios that are creating this instability and the implications for US policy in the region. He identified factors contributing to State vulnerability including the erosion of legitimacy among political authorities, the weak rule of law enabling corruption and organized crime, and political party and elite fragmentation. These three problems cause tremendous distraction among elites in ways that precluded them from focusing on key policy priorities, such as economic development, Dr. Oroczo reported.

Transnational Criminal Organizations

Eric L. Olson

Consultant
Latin American Program
Mexico Institute
Wilson Center

Criminal activity in Central America has direct implications for US State Senate leaders, Mr. Olson pointed out. The region is a bridge, a key part of the transit path for illicit goods entering the US, which provides the best market for them. Mr. Olson noted that organized crime exists where the state is weak or where corruption allows collusion between State authorities and organized crime, which is rampant in the region.

Immigration & Migration

Andrew Selee

President
Migration Policy Institute

Migration from Northern Triangle countries of Central America (El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala) now exceeds that from Mexico, and demographics also are changing. More families and minors trying to cross the border on migration routes through Mexico to Rio Grande Valley or to West Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California border areas.

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JANUARY 3–6, 2019

Instability of Central America & the US Response (Part 2)

Political Climate

Manuel Orozco, PhD

Director
Migration, Remittances and Development
Inter-American Dialogue

Dr. Orozco reported a trend of increasing state fragility and political instability in Central America since 2010. He drew a stark picture of the trends, causes, and scenarios that are creating this instability and the implications for US policy in the region. He identified factors contributing to State vulnerability including the erosion of legitimacy among political authorities, the weak rule of law enabling corruption and organized crime, and political party and elite fragmentation. These three problems cause tremendous distraction among elites in ways that precluded them from focusing on key policy priorities, such as economic development, Dr. Oroczo reported.

Transnational Criminal Organizations

Eric L. Olson

Consultant
Latin American Program
Mexico Institute
Wilson Center

Criminal activity in Central America has direct implications for US State Senate leaders, Mr. Olson pointed out. The region is a bridge, a key part of the transit path for illicit goods entering the US, which provides the best market for them. Mr. Olson noted that organized crime exists where the state is weak or where corruption allows collusion between State authorities and organized crime, which is rampant in the region.

Immigration & Migration

Andrew Selee

President
Migration Policy Institute

Migration from Northern Triangle countries of Central America (El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala) now exceeds that from Mexico, and demographics also are changing. More families and minors trying to cross the border on migration routes through Mexico to Rio Grande Valley or to West Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California border areas.

JANUARY 3–6, 2019

Instability of Central America & the US Response (Part 2)

Political Climate

Manuel Orozco, PhD

Director
Migration, Remittances and Development
Inter-American Dialogue

Dr. Orozco reported a trend of increasing state fragility and political instability in Central America since 2010. He drew a stark picture of the trends, causes, and scenarios that are creating this instability and the implications for US policy in the region. He identified factors contributing to State vulnerability including the erosion of legitimacy among political authorities, the weak rule of law enabling corruption and organized crime, and political party and elite fragmentation. These three problems cause tremendous distraction among elites in ways that precluded them from focusing on key policy priorities, such as economic development, Dr. Oroczo reported.

Transnational Criminal Organizations

Eric L. Olson

Consultant
Latin American Program
Mexico Institute
Wilson Center

Criminal activity in Central America has direct implications for US State Senate leaders, Mr. Olson pointed out. The region is a bridge, a key part of the transit path for illicit goods entering the US, which provides the best market for them. Mr. Olson noted that organized crime exists where the state is weak or where corruption allows collusion between State authorities and organized crime, which is rampant in the region.

Immigration & Migration

Andrew Selee

President
Migration Policy Institute

Migration from Northern Triangle countries of Central America (El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala) now exceeds that from Mexico, and demographics also are changing. More families and minors trying to cross the border on migration routes through Mexico to Rio Grande Valley or to West Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California border areas.