REPORT: February 5 Member Meeting

The Vaccine Rollout

Nancy Messonnier, MD

Director
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)
at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

 

Polling: How is your state doing on vaccinations?

The session began with polling questions on how senators rated the success of their state’s vaccine rollout. The majority reported being dissatisfied with how the process has worked thus far. They cited a variety of obstacles, with a major focus on lack of supply and the logistical challenges of administering the vaccines — especially to populations such as rural residents and the elderly — and disproportionately affected populations. When queried about how the federal government could best help the states, most respondents indicated the highest need with supply chain logistics and technical support activities.

 

Obstacles

 

Federal Support

Federal Help for the States

Nancy Messonnier, MD, the Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) responded to these issues, noting, “Collectively, we face immense responsibility for the COVID vaccine program, and our success depends on pulling together across states, communities, and government entities.” Dr. Messonnier is leading the CDC’s effort on the COVID-19 vaccine program in the areas of distribution, administration, implementation, safety, and access.

 “Collectively, we face immense responsibility for the vaccine rollout, and our success depends on pulling together across states, communities, and government entities.”— Dr. Nancy Messonnier, MD

Prioritizing Vaccine Distribution

Best Practices

CDC Technical Assistance and Resources

 “We need high vaccination coverage in every corner
of every community to stop the pandemic.”
— Dr. Nancy Messonnier, MD

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Tom Finneran: You mentioned “positive momentum” in moving the vaccine program forward. What is giving you this confidence?

Dr. Messonnier: Public opinion polls in September and October showed a low acceptance of the vaccine, but today there is a groundswell of support. People are excited and eager to get their turn for vaccination. Now, there is a greater sense of “we’re all in this together.” Clinicians also are more comfortable with the vaccine, and we are seeing better operationalization of aspects like the requirement for cold chain maintenance. We are getting more familiar with supply chain issues, recognizing that we need to retain some vaccine in the pipeline in order to ensure supply.

Today there is a groundswell of support [for the vaccine]. Now there is a greater sense of “we’re all in this together.”

Josh Brown (National Vice President, Pfizer): Dr. Messonnier has been at the center of the vaccine rollout and has done a great job of keeping the momentum growing.

Pharmaceutical companies have been working on the vaccine for less than a year. It is unprecedented to have a vaccine developed, fully tested, approved and into arms in such a short time. However, the states still face urgent issues including: when will we get more vaccine, what’s the hold-up, and what are the potential impacts of variants and mutations.

Pfizer is working to address these concerns. The company had initially committed to 100 million doses by the end of the first quarter, plus another 100 million doses by the end of June. By working together with other manufacturers, that timeframe has been accelerated. Last week, 30 million doses were shipped, and an exponential 40% increase in the supply is expected in the next few weeks, with an anticipated 120 million doses delivered by the end of March and 200 million doses by the end of May. Furthermore, Pfizer is working to provide more predictability about supply projections.

States can benefit from consultations with experienced CDC strike teams to assess local barriers to vaccine administration and develop local strategies to overcome them.

Tom Finneran: Some states like West Virginia and the Dakotas have had very successful vaccine rollouts. What can be learned from their experiences?

Dr. Messonnier: Every state is very different and faces unique challenges; however, West Virginia and the Dakotas had some strategies in common that other states could replicate. They brought a lot of stakeholders to the table early on to develop a cohesive plan and consistent messaging. They ensured that everyone was on message for advocacy and communication.

Gerard Dehrmann (Senior Vice President Public Affairs & State and Local Government Relations, Walmart Stores): Walmart is working with the CDC and Health and Human Services (HHS), and our Walmart pharmacies are preferred providers in 22 states. The pharmacies have embraced a “Show up and sign up” strategy and, to date, have administered 100,000 vaccine doses.

The company uses every communication channel to address frequently asked questions and overcome vaccine hesitancy. One lesson learned is the importance of ensuring that the message is delivered by people who have earned their constituents’ confidence and trust, such as local aldermen or clergy from the same neighborhood — “People who look like your clients.”

 An important step in overcoming vaccine hesitancy is to have messages of confidence conveyed by one’s neighbors and trusted members of the community.

Walmart engages with many different stakeholder groups for vaccine outreach. We work with payers and insurers to ensure that elderly people are informed and signed up to get the vaccines, and we sponsor events with teachers, veterans, and clergy who are messengers in getting the word out and who are bringing people together to get vaccinated.

Daniel J. Wahby (Senior Director, State Government Affairs, Eli Lilly): The work the CDC is doing to get people vaccinated is so critical, but until everyone is vaccinated, many people are still at risk of getting COVID-19 or already have the infection. Lilly is among the companies whose monoclonal antibody therapies have been granted Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the FDA for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in high-risk patients. What is the role of treatment in ending the pandemic?

Dr. Messonnier: The CDC website for the National Institutes of Health provides Treatment Guidelines for the treatment of patients with COVID-19. It is imperative for patients to receive appropriate care in order to combat the risk and spread of infection. Even after receiving vaccination, people need to double-down on the safety precautions: wear a mask, wash your hands, and maintain social distance.

Sen. Robert Stivers (President of the Senate, KY): Who could have imagined that all of our economy and our educational system would be dependent on one shot in the arm? But that’s where we find ourselves today. This situation requires us to work together across many boundaries, with particular thanks to our private sector partners such as those we’ve heard from today.

 

Speaker Biography

Nancy Messonnier, MD

Director
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) at the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Nancy Messonnier, MD, is the Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) and is currently leading CDC’s efforts on COVID-19 vaccine. In late 2019, Dr. Messonnier directed NCIRD to activate a center-based response to an unknown respiratory disease in China that later transitioned to a full agency response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the COVID-19 response, Dr. Messonnier is leading the effort to support the COVID-19 vaccine program in the areas of distribution, administration, implementation, safety, and access for hard-to-reach populations with the goal of ensuring that a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine is available to every American who wants one.

Download PDF of article

 

 

 The Forum Welcomes
New Senate Participants
Sen. Matt Huffman
President of the Senate
(Ohio)
 Sen. Ty Masterson
President of the Senate
(Kansas)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COVID-19 Integrated County ViewsThe CDC’s COVID Data Tracker includes a county view of key data, updated daily. Click the map to learn more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vaccine Distribution
By States
The ACIP’s recommendations are subject to interpretation by the states. For an up-to-date report on how each state is prioritizing vaccine distribution, see State Health Facts (courtesy Kaiser Family Foundation).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access the CDC’s Extensive Free Resources:Directory of State and Territorial Health OfficialsTechnical AssistanceVaccination Communication ToolkitRecipient Education ToolkitLong-Term Care Facility ToolkitCOVID-19 Vaccination Toolkits — Additional resources, including Toolkits for Special Populations and Clinical TrainingIf the Senate Presidents’ Forum can help you locate or access additional information, please contact us.

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

REPORT: February 5 Member Meeting

The Vaccine Rollout

Nancy Messonnier, MD

Director
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)
at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Polling: How is your state doing on vaccinations?

The session began with polling questions on how senators rated the success of their state’s vaccine rollout. The majority reported being dissatisfied with how the process has worked thus far. They cited a variety of obstacles, with a major focus on lack of supply and the logistical challenges of administering the vaccines — especially to populations such as rural residents and the elderly — and disproportionately affected populations. When queried about how the federal government could best help the states, most respondents indicated the highest need with supply chain logistics and technical support activities.

 

Obstacles

 

Federal Support

Federal Help for the States

Nancy Messonnier, MD, the Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) responded to these issues, noting, “Collectively, we face immense responsibility for the COVID vaccine program, and our success depends on pulling together across states, communities, and government entities.” Dr. Messonnier is leading the CDC’s effort on the COVID-19 vaccine program in the areas of distribution, administration, implementation, safety, and access.

 “Collectively, we face immense responsibility for the vaccine rollout, and our success depends on pulling together across states, communities, and government entities.”— Dr. Nancy Messonnier, MD

Prioritizing Vaccine Distribution

Best Practices

CDC Technical Assistance and Resources

 “We need high vaccination coverage in every corner
of every community to stop the pandemic.”
— Dr. Nancy Messonnier, MD

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Tom Finneran: You mentioned “positive momentum” in moving the vaccine program forward. What is giving you this confidence?

Dr. Messonnier: Public opinion polls in September and October showed a low acceptance of the vaccine, but today there is a groundswell of support. People are excited and eager to get their turn for vaccination. Now, there is a greater sense of “we’re all in this together.” Clinicians also are more comfortable with the vaccine, and we are seeing better operationalization of aspects like the requirement for cold chain maintenance. We are getting more familiar with supply chain issues, recognizing that we need to retain some vaccine in the pipeline in order to ensure supply.

Today there is a groundswell of support [for the vaccine]. Now there is a greater sense of “we’re all in this together.”

Josh Brown (National Vice President, Pfizer): Dr. Messonnier has been at the center of the vaccine rollout and has done a great job of keeping the momentum growing.

Pharmaceutical companies have been working on the vaccine for less than a year. It is unprecedented to have a vaccine developed, fully tested, approved and into arms in such a short time. However, the states still face urgent issues including: when will we get more vaccine, what’s the hold-up, and what are the potential impacts of variants and mutations.

Pfizer is working to address these concerns. The company had initially committed to 100 million doses by the end of the first quarter, plus another 100 million doses by the end of June. By working together with other manufacturers, that timeframe has been accelerated. Last week, 30 million doses were shipped, and an exponential 40% increase in the supply is expected in the next few weeks, with an anticipated 120 million doses delivered by the end of March and 200 million doses by the end of May. Furthermore, Pfizer is working to provide more predictability about supply projections.

States can benefit from consultations with experienced CDC strike teams to assess local barriers to vaccine administration and develop local strategies to overcome them.

Tom Finneran: Some states like West Virginia and the Dakotas have had very successful vaccine rollouts. What can be learned from their experiences?

Dr. Messonnier: Every state is very different and faces unique challenges; however, West Virginia and the Dakotas had some strategies in common that other states could replicate. They brought a lot of stakeholders to the table early on to develop a cohesive plan and consistent messaging. They ensured that everyone was on message for advocacy and communication.

Gerard Dehrmann (Senior Vice President Public Affairs & State and Local Government Relations, Walmart Stores): Walmart is working with the CDC and Health and Human Services (HHS), and our Walmart pharmacies are preferred providers in 22 states. The pharmacies have embraced a “Show up and sign up” strategy and, to date, have administered 100,000 vaccine doses.

The company uses every communication channel to address frequently asked questions and overcome vaccine hesitancy. One lesson learned is the importance of ensuring that the message is delivered by people who have earned their constituents’ confidence and trust, such as local aldermen or clergy from the same neighborhood — “People who look like your clients.”

 An important step in overcoming vaccine hesitancy is to have messages of confidence conveyed by one’s neighbors and trusted members of the community.

Walmart engages with many different stakeholder groups for vaccine outreach. We work with payers and insurers to ensure that elderly people are informed and signed up to get the vaccines, and we sponsor events with teachers, veterans, and clergy who are messengers in getting the word out and who are bringing people together to get vaccinated.

Daniel J. Wahby (Senior Director, State Government Affairs, Eli Lilly): The work the CDC is doing to get people vaccinated is so critical, but until everyone is vaccinated, many people are still at risk of getting COVID-19 or already have the infection. Lilly is among the companies whose monoclonal antibody therapies have been granted Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the FDA for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in high-risk patients. What is the role of treatment in ending the pandemic?

Dr. Messonnier: The CDC website for the National Institutes of Health provides Treatment Guidelines for the treatment of patients with COVID-19. It is imperative for patients to receive appropriate care in order to combat the risk and spread of infection. Even after receiving vaccination, people need to double-down on the safety precautions: wear a mask, wash your hands, and maintain social distance.

Sen. Robert Stivers (President of the Senate, KY): Who could have imagined that all of our economy and our educational system would be dependent on one shot in the arm? But that’s where we find ourselves today. This situation requires us to work together across many boundaries, with particular thanks to our private sector partners such as those we’ve heard from today.

 

Speaker Biography

Nancy Messonnier, MD

Director
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) at the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Nancy Messonnier, MD, is the Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) and is currently leading CDC’s efforts on COVID-19 vaccine. In late 2019, Dr. Messonnier directed NCIRD to activate a center-based response to an unknown respiratory disease in China that later transitioned to a full agency response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the COVID-19 response, Dr. Messonnier is leading the effort to support the COVID-19 vaccine program in the areas of distribution, administration, implementation, safety, and access for hard-to-reach populations with the goal of ensuring that a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine is available to every American who wants one.

Download PDF of article

 

 The Forum Welcomes
New Senate Participants
Sen. Matt Huffman
President of the Senate
(Ohio)
 Sen. Ty Masterson
President of the Senate
(Kansas)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COVID-19 Integrated County ViewsThe CDC’s COVID Data Tracker includes a county view of key data, updated daily. Click the map to learn more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vaccine Distribution
By States
The ACIP’s recommendations are subject to interpretation by the states. For an up-to-date report on how each state is prioritizing vaccine distribution, see State Health Facts (courtesy Kaiser Family Foundation).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access the CDC’s Extensive Free Resources:Directory of State and Territorial Health OfficialsTechnical AssistanceVaccination Communication ToolkitRecipient Education ToolkitLong-Term Care Facility ToolkitCOVID-19 Vaccination Toolkits — Additional resources, including Toolkits for Special Populations and Clinical TrainingIf the Senate Presidents’ Forum can help you locate or access additional information, please contact us.

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

REPORT: February 5 Member Meeting

The Vaccine Rollout

Download PDF of article

Nancy Messonnier, MD

Director
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)
at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

 The Forum Welcomes New Senate ParticipantsSen. Matt Huffman
President of the Senate
(Ohio)
 
Sen. Ty Masterson
President of the Senate
(Kansas)

Polling: How is your state doing on vaccinations?

The session began with polling questions on how senators rated the success of their state’s vaccine rollout. The majority reported being dissatisfied with how the process has worked thus far. They cited a variety of obstacles, with a major focus on lack of supply and the logistical challenges of administering the vaccines — especially to populations such as rural residents and the elderly — and disproportionately affected populations. When queried about how the federal government could best help the states, most respondents indicated the highest need with supply chain logistics and technical support activities.

Obstacles

Federal Support

Federal Help for the States

Nancy Messonnier, MD, the Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) responded to these issues, noting, “Collectively, we face immense responsibility for the COVID vaccine program, and our success depends on pulling together across states, communities, and government entities.” Dr. Messonnier is leading the CDC’s effort on the COVID-19 vaccine program in the areas of distribution, administration, implementation, safety, and access.

 “Collectively, we face immense responsibility for the vaccine rollout, and our success depends on pulling together across states, communities, and government entities.”— Dr. Nancy Messonnier, MD

 

COVID-19 Integrated County ViewsThe CDC’s COVID Data Tracker includes a county view of key data, updated daily. Click the map to learn more.

Prioritizing Vaccine Distribution

 

Vaccine Distribution
By States
The ACIP’s recommendations are subject to interpretation by the states. For an up-to-date report on how each state is prioritizing vaccine distribution, see State Health Facts (courtesy Kaiser Family Foundation).

Best Practices

CDC Technical Assistance and Resources

 “We need high vaccination coverage in every corner
of every community to stop the pandemic.”
— Dr. Nancy Messonnier, MD

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Tom Finneran: You mentioned “positive momentum” in moving the vaccine program forward. What is giving you this confidence?

Dr. Messonnier: Public opinion polls in September and October showed a low acceptance of the vaccine, but today there is a groundswell of support. People are excited and eager to get their turn for vaccination. Now, there is a greater sense of “we’re all in this together.” Clinicians also are more comfortable with the vaccine, and we are seeing better operationalization of aspects like the requirement for cold chain maintenance. We are getting more familiar with supply chain issues, recognizing that we need to retain some vaccine in the pipeline in order to ensure supply.

Today there is a groundswell of support [for the vaccine]. Now there is a greater sense of “we’re all in this together.”

Josh Brown (National Vice President, Pfizer): Dr. Messonnier has been at the center of the vaccine rollout and has done a great job of keeping the momentum growing.

Pharmaceutical companies have been working on the vaccine for less than a year. It is unprecedented to have a vaccine developed, fully tested, approved and into arms in such a short time. However, the states still face urgent issues including: when will we get more vaccine, what’s the hold-up, and what are the potential impacts of variants and mutations.

Pfizer is working to address these concerns. The company had initially committed to 100 million doses by the end of the first quarter, plus another 100 million doses by the end of June. By working together with other manufacturers, that timeframe has been accelerated. Last week, 30 million doses were shipped, and an exponential 40% increase in the supply is expected in the next few weeks, with an anticipated 120 million doses delivered by the end of March and 200 million doses by the end of May. Furthermore, Pfizer is working to provide more predictability about supply projections.

States can benefit from consultations with experienced CDC strike teams to assess local barriers to vaccine administration and develop local strategies to overcome them.

Tom Finneran: Some states like West Virginia and the Dakotas have had very successful vaccine rollouts. What can be learned from their experiences?

Dr. Messonnier: Every state is very different and faces unique challenges; however, West Virginia and the Dakotas had some strategies in common that other states could replicate. They brought a lot of stakeholders to the table early on to develop a cohesive plan and consistent messaging. They ensured that everyone was on message for advocacy and communication.

Gerard Dehrmann (Senior Vice President Public Affairs & State and Local Government Relations, Walmart Stores): Walmart is working with the CDC and Health and Human Services (HHS), and our Walmart pharmacies are preferred providers in 22 states. The pharmacies have embraced a “Show up and sign up” strategy and, to date, have administered 100,000 vaccine doses.

The company uses every communication channel to address frequently asked questions and overcome vaccine hesitancy. One lesson learned is the importance of ensuring that the message is delivered by people who have earned their constituents’ confidence and trust, such as local aldermen or clergy from the same neighborhood — “People who look like your clients.”

 An important step in overcoming vaccine hesitancy is to have messages of confidence conveyed by one’s neighbors and trusted members of the community.

Walmart engages with many different stakeholder groups for vaccine outreach. We work with payers and insurers to ensure that elderly people are informed and signed up to get the vaccines, and we sponsor events with teachers, veterans, and clergy who are messengers in getting the word out and who are bringing people together to get vaccinated.

Daniel J. Wahby (Senior Director, State Government Affairs, Eli Lilly): The work the CDC is doing to get people vaccinated is so critical, but until everyone is vaccinated, many people are still at risk of getting COVID-19 or already have the infection. Lilly is among the companies whose monoclonal antibody therapies have been granted Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the FDA for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in high-risk patients. What is the role of treatment in ending the pandemic?

Dr. Messonnier: The CDC website for the National Institutes of Health provides Treatment Guidelines for the treatment of patients with COVID-19. It is imperative for patients to receive appropriate care in order to combat the risk and spread of infection. Even after receiving vaccination, people need to double-down on the safety precautions: wear a mask, wash your hands, and maintain social distance.

Sen. Robert Stivers (President of the Senate, KY): Who could have imagined that all of our economy and our educational system would be dependent on one shot in the arm? But that’s where we find ourselves today. This situation requires us to work together across many boundaries, with particular thanks to our private sector partners such as those we’ve heard from today.

 

Speaker Biography

Nancy Messonnier, MD

Director
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) at the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Nancy Messonnier, MD, is the Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) and is currently leading CDC’s efforts on COVID-19 vaccine. In late 2019, Dr. Messonnier directed NCIRD to activate a center-based response to an unknown respiratory disease in China that later transitioned to a full agency response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the COVID-19 response, Dr. Messonnier is leading the effort to support the COVID-19 vaccine program in the areas of distribution, administration, implementation, safety, and access for hard-to-reach populations with the goal of ensuring that a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine is available to every American who wants one.

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.