July 11-15, 2018

Asia-US Relations—The Macro Picture

Satu Limaye, PhD

Director
East-West Center

The macro picture of Asia is currently a swirling and unpredictable collage of change. Despite this, many issues also are unchanged from 25 years ago, according to Dr. Satu Limaye, Director of the East-West Center, including the challenges of managing alliances in the region, setting trade policies, and dealing with China’s emergence as a power. Mr. Limaye also outlined significant positive changes and opportunities that are part of the complexity of US relations with Asia. US geopolitical policy also has profound effects on regional stability, and Mr. Limaye explored the impacts of current US policies on it.

Asia is Central to US Economic and Security Policies

The changes in Asia are profoundly influenced by China’s unexpectedly rapid rise in economic, political, and military power. There is greater economic integration of the region as technologies have been shared, and regional markets have developed. However, interregional trade is already reaching its peak, and, despite robust trade contacts, political relationships among Asian countries are weak, and they have little ability to control interregional affairs on their own.

The US has built strong relations with Asian countries, such as India, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Indonesia among others, and these countries rely on US support to stabilize the region. Asians continue to regard the US as the key contributor to regional peace and prosperity. As a result, Asia and, particularly China, have become central elements in US policies for international economics, trade, and security.

Asia’s Concerns About the US

But Asians are concerned about continuing US support for the region, as actions by the Trump administration raise questions about the unpredictability of US strategy in Asia. As the US accumulates double-digit trade deficits with Asian countries, they wonder if they are next in line for policy changes such as the tariffs imposed on Chinese exports to the US. As Asian countries watch internal conflicts in the US concerning domestic issues and changing strategies for the Mideast and Europe, this raises concerns that such debates could lead to policy changes for them as well. They are also worried about continued US military support for the region, despite the US military’s continued presence and its leadership of military exercises in the region.

Positive Developments in Asia-US Relations

Dr. Limaye pointed out that there are many positive aspects of current US relations with Asian countries. There is agreement in the US that Asia is critical to US trade and military security, that the US needs strong allies in the region. Furthermore, the political relations between the US and Asian countries, including China, are institutionalized, providing established diplomatic mechanisms to manage differences.

However, China’s mistakes in the region, such as its aggressive actions to claim sovereignty over adjacent maritime space and its illegal trade strategies, have made relations between other Asian countries and the US even more important. China is viewed with distrust and suspicion by other Asian countries even as they seek productive commercial relations with a fast-growing China. They do not want to be at the mercy of a powerful, unrestrained China. As a result, the desire to maintain positive relations with the US exerts considerable influence over the allies’ critical decisions about regional political, military, and economic strategies. In addition, the US is attractive for Asian investment, education, immigration, and the flow of family monies. The US is considered a safe “docking place” for investments. Overall, US relations both with China and with other Asian countries are stronger than intra-regional relationships.

Dr. Limaye hosts a comprehensive website that provides US state-by-state and Asian country-by-country reports on export volume, jobs supported by exports, Foreign Direct Investment, visitor spending, and economic impact of students.https://asiamattersforamerica.org/asia/data

Discussion

Sen. Brent Hill (ID): How do Asian countries react to reports of China’s intellectual property theft and industrial espionage? What are the long-term effects of trade tariffs?

Dr. Limaye: Most countries are worried about intellectual property theft and industrial espionage; however, the current administration’s approach of imposing tariffs does not solve the problem. Several Asian countries, including China, Malaysia, and South Korea, have double digit trade surpluses with the US. As China faces tariffs, other Asian nations with a positive trade balance worry that tariffs and penalties may be imposed on them as well.

When the US withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, the remaining 11 nations (Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Mexico, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam) created the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). They are looking for ways to manage international trade agreements without the US. Their concern is that the US refusal to participate is forcing them to look for better alternatives.

Sen. Wayne Niederhauser (UT): China claims they are not seeking to annex new territories, but rather they seek to reclaim those lands that were historically part of China, such as Taiwan, and to restore historical fishing rights. What is the reality?

Dr. Limaye: There are 14 border countries with China as well as maritime nations that are adjacent to Chinese waters. China claims lands in Pakistan, South Tibet, portions of Korea, and, in the South China Sea, parts of the Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Vietnam. China pretends to support the rule of international law but asserts that their historic claims to these lands take precedence over international law. Asian countries face the anxiety of not knowing where China’s claims will end. China is authoritarian. They will simply draw a map and say “This is ours. You can negotiate with us or we will just annex you.”

No Asian country, including China, can dictate global relations. The support and participation of the US is necessary to give Asian countries a voice in international affairs. If the US is not present, there is growing uncertainty about the future of the region and increased anxiety about China.

Sen. Eduardo Bhatia (PR): What about human rights violations in the Philippines. Is the US putting pressure on them to stop the violations or is the US military partnership with the Philippines more important than human rights?

Dr. Limaye: The US Congress blocked a shipment of arms to the Philippines to protest the violations. However, extrajudicial killings do not evoke a big public reaction. In fact, there was an uproar in this 75% Catholic country when Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte said, “If anyone can prove God exists, I will resign.” Philippine people are tolerant of law and order approaches for anti-drug and anticorruption actions. The economy is good for most people and the military is quiescent. If the US were to protest the killings, President Duterte would use it to fuel nationalism, claiming, “The US can’t tell us what to do.”

Sen. David Long (IN): Indiana has a close relationship with India and we see its great potential as a trade partner, as well as a buffer for China. There are great economic opportunities arising from India’s medical expertise and access to venture capital. What are the opportunities in India?

Dr. Limaye: India is a major opportunity for the US, especially as the Chinese economy might face increasing troubles. India is a massively untapped potential trade partner with an economy growing at 7% annually. They also have a demographic advantage with a rapidly growing youth population, in contrast to Japan and South Korea, which have rapidly aging populations.

India has focused on education, science, and technology, creating significant promise for companies, trade, and investment. India has advanced industries in food processing, auto parts, technology, and medical research and technology for healthcare.

However, the Indian government has a restrictive strategy focused on maintaining diverse sources of goods and diverse relationships, and imposes trade restrictions. They will not put all their economic eggs into the US basket.

Sen. Eli Bebout (WY): What will be the long-term effect on international trade of Asia’s population growth?

Dr. Limaye: The demographics of Asia are changing. Japan’s population is down 139,000, South Korea and China have slowing population growth. In contrast, India, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Myanmar all have growing youthful populations. Since 1945, the US has focused on northeast Asia (Korea, China, Taiwan, Japan). But now the countries of Southeast Asia are becoming more important. Economic growth will follow as the middle class develops in these countries.

Sen. John Cullerton (IL): What is Russia’s role in the region?

Dr. Limaye: Russia and India flow in and out of the Asian sphere of influence. China and Russia have relatively good relations. And, while Russia is involved in the Japanese islands dispute, people are more worried about Chinese territorial expansion than about Russian interventions. Furthermore, the US Indo Pac Command has taken a strong stance covering the area from the Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean and the Western US.

Speaker Biography

Satu Limaye

Dr. Satu Limaye is Director of the East-West Center in Washington. He is also a Senior Advisor at the CNA Corporation, a non-profit research and analysis organization located in Arlington, VA. He is the creator and director of the Asia Matters for America initiative, an interactive resource for credible, non-partisan information, graphics, analysis and news on US-Asia Pacific relations and the national, state and local levels; Founding Editor of the Asia-Pacific Bulletin series, an editor of the journal Global Asia and on the international advisory council of the journal Contemporary Southeast Asia.

Dr. Limaye publishes and speaks on U.S.-Asia relations and is a reviewer for numerous publications, foundations and fellowship programs. Previously, he was a Research Staff Member of the Strategy and Resources Division at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) and Director of Research and Publications at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS), a direct reporting unit of U.S. Pacific Command.

He has been an Abe Fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy and a Henry Luce Scholar and Research Fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) in Tokyo. He is a magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Georgetown University and received his doctorate from Oxford University (Magdalen College) where he was a George C. Marshall Scholar.

Related Publications:

Challenges for U.S.-Asia Pacific Policy in the Second Bush Administration

Asians continue to regard the US as the key contributor to regional peace and prosperity.

Sen. Brent Hill (ID)

There is agreement in the US that Asia is critical to US trade and military security.

China is viewed with distrust and suspicion by other Asian countries even as they seek productive commercial relations with a fast-growing China. They do not want to be at the mercy of a powerful, unrestrained China.

Sen. Wayne Niederhauser (UT)

Sen. Eduardo Bhatia (PR)

Sen. David Long (IN)

Sen. Eli Bebout (WY)

Sen. John Cullerton (IL)

Satu Limaye

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Copyright © 2018 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

July 11-15, 2018

Asia-US Relations—The Macro Picture

Satu Limaye, PhD

Director
East-West Center

The macro picture of Asia is currently a swirling and unpredictable collage of change. Despite this, many issues also are unchanged from 25 years ago, according to Dr. Satu Limaye, Director of the East-West Center, including the challenges of managing alliances in the region, setting trade policies, and dealing with China’s emergence as a power. Mr. Limaye also outlined significant positive changes and opportunities that are part of the complexity of US relations with Asia. US geopolitical policy also has profound effects on regional stability, and Mr. Limaye explored the impacts of current US policies on it.

Asia is Central to US Economic and Security Policies

The changes in Asia are profoundly influenced by China’s unexpectedly rapid rise in economic, political, and military power. There is greater economic integration of the region as technologies have been shared, and regional markets have developed. However, interregional trade is already reaching its peak, and, despite robust trade contacts, political relationships among Asian countries are weak, and they have little ability to control interregional affairs on their own.

The US has built strong relations with Asian countries, such as India, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Indonesia among others, and these countries rely on US support to stabilize the region. Asians continue to regard the US as the key contributor to regional peace and prosperity. As a result, Asia and, particularly China, have become central elements in US policies for international economics, trade, and security.

Asians continue to regard the US as the key contributor to regional peace and prosperity.

Asia’s Concerns About the US

But Asians are concerned about continuing US support for the region, as actions by the Trump administration raise questions about the unpredictability of US strategy in Asia. As the US accumulates double-digit trade deficits with Asian countries, they wonder if they are next in line for policy changes such as the tariffs imposed on Chinese exports to the US. As Asian countries watch internal conflicts in the US concerning domestic issues and changing strategies for the Mideast and Europe, this raises concerns that such debates could lead to policy changes for them as well. They are also worried about continued US military support for the region, despite the US military’s continued presence and its leadership of military exercises in the region.

Positive Developments in Asia-US Relations

Dr. Limaye pointed out that there are many positive aspects of current US relations with Asian countries. There is agreement in the US that Asia is critical to US trade and military security, that the US needs strong allies in the region. Furthermore, the political relations between the US and Asian countries, including China, are institutionalized, providing established diplomatic mechanisms to manage differences.

There is agreement in the US that Asia is critical to US trade and military security.

However, China’s mistakes in the region, such as its aggressive actions to claim sovereignty over adjacent maritime space and its illegal trade strategies, have made relations between other Asian countries and the US even more important. China is viewed with distrust and suspicion by other Asian countries even as they seek productive commercial relations with a fast-growing China. They do not want to be at the mercy of a powerful, unrestrained China. As a result, the desire to maintain positive relations with the US exerts considerable influence over the allies’ critical decisions about regional political, military, and economic strategies. In addition, the US is attractive for Asian investment, education, immigration, and the flow of family monies. The US is considered a safe “docking place” for investments. Overall, US relations both with China and with other Asian countries are stronger than intra-regional relationships.

China is viewed with distrust and suspicion by other Asian countries even as they seek productive commercial relations with a fast-growing China. They do not want to be at the mercy of a powerful, unrestrained China.

Dr. Limaye hosts a comprehensive website that provides US state-by-state and Asian country-by-country reports on export volume, jobs supported by exports, Foreign Direct Investment, visitor spending, and economic impact of students.https://asiamattersforamerica.org/asia/data

Discussion

Sen. Brent Hill (ID): How do Asian countries react to reports of China’s intellectual property theft and industrial espionage? What are the long-term effects of trade tariffs?

Dr. Limaye: Most countries are worried about intellectual property theft and industrial espionage; however, the current administration’s approach of imposing tariffs does not solve the problem. Several Asian countries, including China, Malaysia, and South Korea, have double digit trade surpluses with the US. As China faces tariffs, other Asian nations with a positive trade balance worry that tariffs and penalties may be imposed on them as well.

When the US withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, the remaining 11 nations (Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Mexico, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam) created the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). They are looking for ways to manage international trade agreements without the US. Their concern is that the US refusal to participate is forcing them to look for better alternatives.

Sen. Wayne Niederhauser (UT): China claims they are not seeking to annex new territories, but rather they seek to reclaim those lands that were historically part of China, such as Taiwan, and to restore historical fishing rights. What is the reality?

Dr. Limaye: There are 14 border countries with China as well as maritime nations that are adjacent to Chinese waters. China claims lands in Pakistan, South Tibet, portions of Korea, and, in the South China Sea, parts of the Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Vietnam. China pretends to support the rule of international law but asserts that their historic claims to these lands take precedence over international law. Asian countries face the anxiety of not knowing where China’s claims will end. China is authoritarian. They will simply draw a map and say “This is ours. You can negotiate with us or we will just annex you.”

No Asian country, including China, can dictate global relations. The support and participation of the US is necessary to give Asian countries a voice in international affairs. If the US is not present, there is growing uncertainty about the future of the region and increased anxiety about China.

Sen. Eduardo Bhatia (PR): What about human rights violations in the Philippines. Is the US putting pressure on them to stop the violations or is the US military partnership with the Philippines more important than human rights?

Dr. Limaye: The US Congress blocked a shipment of arms to the Philippines to protest the violations. However, extrajudicial killings do not evoke a big public reaction. In fact, there was an uproar in this 75% Catholic country when Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte said, “If anyone can prove God exists, I will resign.” Philippine people are tolerant of law and order approaches for anti-drug and anticorruption actions. The economy is good for most people and the military is quiescent. If the US were to protest the killings, President Duterte would use it to fuel nationalism, claiming, “The US can’t tell us what to do.”

Sen. David Long (IN): Indiana has a close relationship with India and we see its great potential as a trade partner, as well as a buffer for China. There are great economic opportunities arising from India’s medical expertise and access to venture capital. What are the opportunities in India?

Dr. Limaye: India is a major opportunity for the US, especially as the Chinese economy might face increasing troubles. India is a massively untapped potential trade partner with an economy growing at 7% annually. They also have a demographic advantage with a rapidly growing youth population, in contrast to Japan and South Korea, which have rapidly aging populations.

India has focused on education, science, and technology, creating significant promise for companies, trade, and investment. India has advanced industries in food processing, auto parts, technology, and medical research and technology for healthcare.

However, the Indian government has a restrictive strategy focused on maintaining diverse sources of goods and diverse relationships, and imposes trade restrictions. They will not put all their economic eggs into the US basket.

Sen. Eli Bebout (WY): What will be the long-term effect on international trade of Asia’s population growth?

Dr. Limaye: The demographics of Asia are changing. Japan’s population is down 139,000, South Korea and China have slowing population growth. In contrast, India, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Myanmar all have growing youthful populations. Since 1945, the US has focused on northeast Asia (Korea, China, Taiwan, Japan). But now the countries of Southeast Asia are becoming more important. Economic growth will follow as the middle class develops in these countries.

Sen. John Cullerton (IL): What is Russia’s role in the region?

Dr. Limaye: Russia and India flow in and out of the Asian sphere of influence. China and Russia have relatively good relations. And, while Russia is involved in the Japanese islands dispute, people are more worried about Chinese territorial expansion than about Russian interventions. Furthermore, the US Indo Pac Command has taken a strong stance covering the area from the Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean and the Western US.

Speaker Biography

Satu Limaye

Dr. Satu Limaye is Director of the East-West Center in Washington. He is also a Senior Advisor at the CNA Corporation, a non-profit research and analysis organization located in Arlington, VA. He is the creator and director of the Asia Matters for America initiative, an interactive resource for credible, non-partisan information, graphics, analysis and news on US-Asia Pacific relations and the national, state and local levels; Founding Editor of the Asia-Pacific Bulletin series, an editor of the journal Global Asia and on the international advisory council of the journal Contemporary Southeast Asia.

Dr. Limaye publishes and speaks on U.S.-Asia relations and is a reviewer for numerous publications, foundations and fellowship programs. Previously, he was a Research Staff Member of the Strategy and Resources Division at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) and Director of Research and Publications at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS), a direct reporting unit of U.S. Pacific Command.

He has been an Abe Fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy and a Henry Luce Scholar and Research Fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) in Tokyo. He is a magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Georgetown University and received his doctorate from Oxford University (Magdalen College) where he was a George C. Marshall Scholar.

Related Publications:

Challenges for U.S.-Asia Pacific Policy in the Second Bush Administration

July 11-15, 2018

Asia-US Relations —
The Macro Picture

Satu Limaye, PhD

Director
East-West Center

The macro picture of Asia is currently a swirling and unpredictable collage of change. Despite this, many issues also are unchanged from 25 years ago, according to Dr. Satu Limaye, Director of the East-West Center, including the challenges of managing alliances in the region, setting trade policies, and dealing with China’s emergence as a power. Mr. Limaye also outlined significant positive changes and opportunities that are part of the complexity of US relations with Asia. US geopolitical policy also has profound effects on regional stability, and Mr. Limaye explored the impacts of current US policies on it.

Asia is Central to US Economic and Security Policies

The changes in Asia are profoundly influenced by China’s unexpectedly rapid rise in economic, political, and military power. There is greater economic integration of the region as technologies have been shared, and regional markets have developed. However, interregional trade is already reaching its peak, and, despite robust trade contacts, political relationships among Asian countries are weak, and they have little ability to control interregional affairs on their own.

The US has built strong relations with Asian countries, such as India, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Indonesia among others, and these countries rely on US support to stabilize the region. Asians continue to regard the US as the key contributor to regional peace and prosperity. As a result, Asia and, particularly China, have become central elements in US policies for international economics, trade, and security.

Asians continue to regard the US as the key contributor to regional peace and prosperity.

Asia’s Concerns About the US

But Asians are concerned about continuing US support for the region, as actions by the Trump administration raise questions about the unpredictability of US strategy in Asia. As the US accumulates double-digit trade deficits with Asian countries, they wonder if they are next in line for policy changes such as the tariffs imposed on Chinese exports to the US. As Asian countries watch internal conflicts in the US concerning domestic issues and changing strategies for the Mideast and Europe, this raises concerns that such debates could lead to policy changes for them as well. They are also worried about continued US military support for the region, despite the US military’s continued presence and its leadership of military exercises in the region.

Positive Developments in Asia-US Relations

Dr. Limaye pointed out that there are many positive aspects of current US relations with Asian countries. There is agreement in the US that Asia is critical to US trade and military security, that the US needs strong allies in the region. Furthermore, the political relations between the US and Asian countries, including China, are institutionalized, providing established diplomatic mechanisms to manage differences.

There is agreement in the US that Asia is critical to US trade and military security.

However, China’s mistakes in the region, such as its aggressive actions to claim sovereignty over adjacent maritime space and its illegal trade strategies, have made relations between other Asian countries and the US even more important. China is viewed with distrust and suspicion by other Asian countries even as they seek productive commercial relations with a fast-growing China. They do not want to be at the mercy of a powerful, unrestrained China. As a result, the desire to maintain positive relations with the US exerts considerable influence over the allies’ critical decisions about regional political, military, and economic strategies. In addition, the US is attractive for Asian investment, education, immigration, and the flow of family monies. The US is considered a safe “docking place” for investments. Overall, US relations both with China and with other Asian countries are stronger than intra-regional relationships.

China is viewed with distrust and suspicion by other Asian countries even as they seek productive commercial relations with a fast-growing China. They do not want to be at the mercy of a powerful, unrestrained China.

Dr. Limaye hosts a comprehensive website that provides US state-by-state and Asian country-by-country reports on export volume, jobs supported by exports, Foreign Direct Investment, visitor spending, and economic impact of students.https://asiamattersforamerica.org/asia/data

Discussion

Sen. Brent Hill (ID): How do Asian countries react to reports of China’s intellectual property theft and industrial espionage? What are the long-term effects of trade tariffs?

Dr. Limaye: Most countries are worried about intellectual property theft and industrial espionage; however, the current administration’s approach of imposing tariffs does not solve the problem. Several Asian countries, including China, Malaysia, and South Korea, have double digit trade surpluses with the US. As China faces tariffs, other Asian nations with a positive trade balance worry that tariffs and penalties may be imposed on them as well.

When the US withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, the remaining 11 nations (Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Mexico, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam) created the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). They are looking for ways to manage international trade agreements without the US. Their concern is that the US refusal to participate is forcing them to look for better alternatives.

Sen. Wayne Niederhauser (UT): China claims they are not seeking to annex new territories, but rather they seek to reclaim those lands that were historically part of China, such as Taiwan, and to restore historical fishing rights. What is the reality?

Dr. Limaye: There are 14 border countries with China as well as maritime nations that are adjacent to Chinese waters. China claims lands in Pakistan, South Tibet, portions of Korea, and, in the South China Sea, parts of the Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Vietnam. China pretends to support the rule of international law but asserts that their historic claims to these lands take precedence over international law. Asian countries face the anxiety of not knowing where China’s claims will end. China is authoritarian. They will simply draw a map and say “This is ours. You can negotiate with us or we will just annex you.”

No Asian country, including China, can dictate global relations. The support and participation of the US is necessary to give Asian countries a voice in international affairs. If the US is not present, there is growing uncertainty about the future of the region and increased anxiety about China.

Sen. Eduardo Bhatia (PR): What about human rights violations in the Philippines. Is the US putting pressure on them to stop the violations or is the US military partnership with the Philippines more important than human rights?

Dr. Limaye: The US Congress blocked a shipment of arms to the Philippines to protest the violations. However, extrajudicial killings do not evoke a big public reaction. In fact, there was an uproar in this 75% Catholic country when Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte said, “If anyone can prove God exists, I will resign.” Philippine people are tolerant of law and order approaches for anti-drug and anticorruption actions. The economy is good for most people and the military is quiescent. If the US were to protest the killings, President Duterte would use it to fuel nationalism, claiming, “The US can’t tell us what to do.”

Sen. David Long (IN): Indiana has a close relationship with India and we see its great potential as a trade partner, as well as a buffer for China. There are great economic opportunities arising from India’s medical expertise and access to venture capital. What are the opportunities in India?

Dr. Limaye: India is a major opportunity for the US, especially as the Chinese economy might face increasing troubles. India is a massively untapped potential trade partner with an economy growing at 7% annually. They also have a demographic advantage with a rapidly growing youth population, in contrast to Japan and South Korea, which have rapidly aging populations.

India has focused on education, science, and technology, creating significant promise for companies, trade, and investment. India has advanced industries in food processing, auto parts, technology, and medical research and technology for healthcare.

However, the Indian government has a restrictive strategy focused on maintaining diverse sources of goods and diverse relationships, and imposes trade restrictions. They will not put all their economic eggs into the US basket.

 Sen. Eli Bebout (WY): What will be the long-term effect on international trade of Asia’s population growth?

Dr. Limaye: The demographics of Asia are changing. Japan’s population is down 139,000, South Korea and China have slowing population growth. In contrast, India, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Myanmar all have growing youthful populations. Since 1945, the US has focused on northeast Asia (Korea, China, Taiwan, Japan). But now the countries of Southeast Asia are becoming more important. Economic growth will follow as the middle class develops in these countries.

Sen. John Cullerton (IL): What is Russia’s role in the region?

Dr. Limaye: Russia and India flow in and out of the Asian sphere of influence. China and Russia have relatively good relations. And, while Russia is involved in the Japanese islands dispute, people are more worried about Chinese territorial expansion than about Russian interventions. Furthermore, the US Indo Pac Command has taken a strong stance covering the area from the Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean and the Western US.

Speaker Biography

Satu Limaye

Dr. Satu Limaye is Director of the East-West Center in Washington. He is also a Senior Advisor at the CNA Corporation, a non-profit research and analysis organization located in Arlington, VA. He is the creator and director of the Asia Matters for America initiative, an interactive resource for credible, non-partisan information, graphics, analysis and news on US-Asia Pacific relations and the national, state and local levels; Founding Editor of the Asia-Pacific Bulletin series, an editor of the journal Global Asia and on the international advisory council of the journal Contemporary Southeast Asia.

Dr. Limaye publishes and speaks on U.S.-Asia relations and is a reviewer for numerous publications, foundations and fellowship programs. Previously, he was a Research Staff Member of the Strategy and Resources Division at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) and Director of Research and Publications at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS), a direct reporting unit of U.S. Pacific Command.

He has been an Abe Fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy and a Henry Luce Scholar and Research Fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) in Tokyo. He is a magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Georgetown University and received his doctorate from Oxford University (Magdalen College) where he was a George C. Marshall Scholar.

Related Publications:

Challenges for U.S.-Asia Pacific Policy in the Second Bush Administration